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Okay, for those of you who have had knee replacements: How long post-op before you got back to riding, and how appalled was your doctor?
 

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Hi John, I hadn't a knee replacement, I had all my ligaments attached to the knee which snapped off on hill walking accident. I took 8 months before I came back on the saddle. (However I did drive the car after just 3-4 months). The doctors were really useless here. They advised me not to perform ANY physical activities involving the leg. Which I found stupid. They told me I would never be able to jog/run again. And I felt me knee started to stiffen. I did - self diagnosed and allowed myself first cycling (light, short distance first). It did strengthen my leg muscles and then I slowly introduced walks and then running. Now the leg works fine. Of course it is not 100% as it was before but I can function normally with no limits (within reasonable limits). I hope this helps.
 

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It takes a little time as the physio to get the best movement is painful. but well worth it! So persevere and you'll get back to riding. The only thing you won't be able to do is to kneel on your knee - as I know from my wife who has two knee replacements.
 

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I tore 3 of my 4 quads tendons off the top of my left patella whilst diving in the Red Sea on 25 Nov 19. My diving buddies helped me back through the flight and drove my car home from Manchester to Loughborough, arriving in the early hours of Mon 01 Dec. A&E on Monday morning, ultrasound scan on Thu 05, and surgery on Fri 06 Dec 19. I was in a fixed splint to keep my leg straight for 4 weeks, then another 4 weeks in an adjustable hinged brace to weekly increase the bend angle: 45, 60, 75 and 90 deg. My consultant said I could drive again when I could A, fit into the driving seat, and B, safely control the vehicle. I went back to work, and driving, in the final week wearing the hinged brace. I started physio classes in early Mar 20 and managed two before Covid closed everything, but used a 6-week furlough period from work to go on long walks in lieu of physio. I regained a full range of movement by mid-April, using physio exercises at home, and was able to do 10 km walks by mid-May 2020, but still cautious descending stairs. Finally got to see the physio again in Oct 20 and discharged with full range of movement and good strength; I resumed diving in Sep 20. I didn't ride again until May 21, but in Oct 21 took a 10-day trip to Spain and Portugal without knee issues.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I thought swimming was good for your knees. I didn't know you could tear tendons while diving.
 

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Okay, for those of you who have had knee replacements: How long post-op before you got back to riding, and how appalled was your doctor?
I was riding my 560+lb Honda NT700V (Deauville) to physical therapy within 3-4 weeks. My doctor had no issues with it. The knee parts are actually strong enough when you're removed from the operating table. The issue is more of mobility of the knee joint. If you think about it, that's not surprising.

Your leg is cut off in two places. One is above the knee. The other below the knee. I've seen a video on YT where they filmed the knee replacement. That doctor was getting a workout! Getting the new knee joint inserted and set in the bones is not easy...and it is a good thing you're out while they are doing it. As a result, your muscles are really abused and they need to recover.

By the afternoon of my surgery, I was doing laps around the surgical ward using only a walker. By the next afternoon when they released me, I was walking even more. When I got home, I found the crutch to be too cumbersome, so just went with a cane and holding onto things to walk around the house. I can give you more details, if you want.

Let me add one last thing though. Push yourself as much as you possibly can in your physical therapy. My appointments were first thing in the morning on Mondays and Thursdays. I would be in a lot of pain all the way till the night before, only to have the pain lessen by the time of the appointment...then I'd go push myself again and be in pain for a couple more days. Those first weeks are critical in getting your full range of motion back. But as an example of where you can get to, I can kneel on the floor and rest my buttocks on the heels of my feet. I've known several people who had knee replacements and didn't work on getting that range of motion...and they barely can do more than walk.

In the last two years, I've put on close to 30,000 miles (not km) on my F800GT. My riding position on the open road is with the balls of my feet on the pegs, and I can hold that position for hours on end. A total knee replacement does not mean your life needs to be put on hold.

Chris
 

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I agree with working on the range of motion. My dad was not as diligent about continuing his stretching of the knee once the official PT ended and he did not have great range of motion. I ride with several guys who have had knee and hip replacement and they all stress being diligent on PT and stretching.
 

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A bit late coming to this post but here are my two cents worth. I have suffered numerous bone breakages and soft tissue damage over the years. Not all once mind, but including, 5 broken collar bones, both heads of femur snapped off, badly fractured pelvis (the list is extensive).I have a lot of metal plates and screws (does wonders at airport security screening) Not in any motorcycle accidents I might add, but as a professional racing cyclist in Europe and Australia.....it comes with territory. From my own experience, and watching others, ones ability to recover, and the time it takes is dependant on many things. Physically everyone heals at a different rate, as is their ability to wiithstand discomfort/pain. Psychologically, how well does one deal with the trauma. Only you know the answers to these. John, I'd agree with Daboo. Push youself. Not to the point of doing more damage, but get the legs/knees doing what they are intended to do. The human body is a remarkable thing and adapts/repairs quickly when incentivised to do so. My doctors/surgeons were/are appalled at how quickly I resumed physical activity. Hope the surgery went well, and you're back doing all the things you used to do.
 
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