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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
DIY vids. (mods , repair etc)

Hi all , not sure if this has been done , but it would be interesting to post vids of DIY stuff (repairs, mods , oil change etc)

Would be a good sticky thread also.

IMPORTANT NOTICE: Disclaimer . The videos posted in this thread are made mostly by uncertified technicians and not to be used without further investigation on the accuracy of it's content. People who post here, in all good faith , do not take resposability for any dammage or injuries caused by the content of these videos as they are made for demonstration purposes only. Using the information of the DIY videos is at your own risk.
May contain peanuts.... (good one MikeMike)

I'll start : DIY rear brake pads replacement.


Front brake pad:
 

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They only thing I would add is to clean out the caliper with every pad change get some soapy water and a toothbrush and clean those pistons before you push them back in. This will help the gaskets last longer and help prevent a stuck piston.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
They only thing I would add is to clean out the caliper with every pad change get some soapy water and a toothbrush and clean those pistons before you push them back in. This will help the gaskets last longer and help prevent a stuck piston.
THe pistons are fully inserted in caliper while working on the pads but a good wash or blow air in the calipers can't hurt. But after 14.000 km and lots of offroad (2 -3 times a week) , there was not much dirt in there, maybe because I hose my bike down every time I come back from the trail and I really hose the discs and caliper ???? Anyways , suprised how clean they were.

Thanks for the additional input [;)]
 

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The vid of the front brake pad change got our Lorikeet Rex very interested. There is a bird making some noise in the background on your vid and Rex had a good "peep" in response to each chirp. Good to know an Aussie Parrot can talk Canadian![:)]

Good vid - a picture's always worth a thousand words and a movie even more so. From my own experience, a good pin punch set makes the job a little easier and saves the needle nose pliers. But then again, if out on the trail - like you say, use whatever fits.

Cheers,

Bill
 

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Just did my rear brakes and this was invaluable.

I pulled the front brake pads, but they weren't much thinner than the replacements, so I put the old pads back. I did not remove the calipers. The pads seemed to slip in properly and I could feel them pushing against the spring. Is removing the calipers just needed when putting on new pads, or should I be worried? [:0]
 

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Just did my rear brakes and this was invaluable.

I pulled the front brake pads, but they weren't much thinner than the replacements, so I put the old pads back. I did not remove the calipers. The pads seemed to slip in properly and I could feel them pushing against the spring. Is removing the calipers just needed when putting on new pads, or should I be worried? [:0]
No need to be worried. Shouldn't need to remove calipers unless some piston work or serious cleaning required. Bill.
 

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There is a whole mess of these in the Hall of Wisdom. Look at one of the last links.

Realistically, these are of such quality, they belong there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thread stuck. Lets try to keep the posts relevant so those searching can easily find what they're looking for.

Great idea, btw!
Hi Brendan...Thanks for the sticky or whoever it was [:D]
Season is over for some of us and it's time for maintenance. Hopefully , people will document their work on vid and share with everyone on this thread.
Lets keep those vids comming...[:)]
 

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Maddaddy. You need to be careful with this video. You had the ABS ring against the ground.


If you are watching this video!!!! Please do not place the tires so that the ABS ring is on the ground!!! You can cause damage to the ring while changing the tire!
 

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I'm surprised that none suggested blue locktight on the caliper bolts. I always locktight my caliper bolts before I torque. Had a friend's rear caliper fall off when riding. Messed it up pretty bad, not to mention it can kill you too. Also, highly suggest cleaning the pistons. I use a long skinny brass brush with Brake Clean, and then lube the pin, spring plate, and pistons with High temp grease. Just a light coating, and wipe excess off. Thousands of miles of road grime and brake pad dust really accumulates in the calipers.
Nicely done!!
 

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Maddaddy. You need to be careful with this video. You had the ABS ring against the ground.

If you are watching this video!!!! Please do not place the tires so that the ABS ring is on the ground!!! You can cause damage to the ring while changing the tire!
Please explain to your audience what your concern is here and your solution.
 

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Hey Greg,

I'm thinking that 'Jos' is just worried about possible damage to the rotor/abs ring if it's placed directly on the ground [?]

I've seen other tyre installs that place the rotor side; on another tire, milk crate or two pieces of 2 x 4, just as a precaution to keep it safe from any harm.

Not sure what you could do in the bush; dig a hole or use two similar diam logs ... something like that. Maybe those that have done a field repair can comment here ...

Loved the video's! I'm a visual learner and need to see something done before I get the best handle on it [:)]
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
I'm surprised that none suggested blue locktight on the caliper bolts. I always locktight my caliper bolts before I torque. Had a friend's rear caliper fall off when riding. Messed it up pretty bad, not to mention it can kill you too. Also, highly suggest cleaning the pistons. I use a long skinny brass brush with Brake Clean, and then lube the pin, spring plate, and pistons with High temp grease. Just a light coating, and wipe excess off. Thousands of miles of road grime and brake pad dust really accumulates in the calipers.
Rider, thanks for your personal input. I would just like to mention that I follow the BMW repair manual and they do not mention locktite or grease. They do mention torque spec or if it's a one time torque screw (micro-encapsulated) . I often question using grease on caliper pistons. I know many people do this but I wonder why you would want sticky grease on a piston that is already traveling around a seal just like your front fork tubes. We do not grease that . I know you can use brake cleaner to spray everything nice and clean. You can also remove the pistons and seals but I've "always" (happened once back in my youth lol) lubed the NEW seals and pistons with brake fluid to put them back in . The last thing I want is aply sticky grease ( even a thin coat) so that dirt and sand gets stuck in there. I've taken my bike offroad in possibly the worst conditions out there and came back home , hose the bike down and from the video you can see how clean everything is. No brake dust , no sand , no gunk . We all have to rememeber that DIY vids are made from personal experiences and there is room for improvement as we mostly all are amatures and not mecanics. One should also make a minimum of research to validate how accurate a DIY vid is before they atempt to make the repair . People are welcome and should give additional input on a DIY vid if it can help. My DIY vids were on how to change pads but because I "forgot" to talk about maintenance (not the goal of the vids btw as it's not my expertise) here is a link people might be interested in as extra information http://www.motorcyclistonline.com/caliperclean/index.html
 

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Don't wish to argue or take sides but I have to agree with the suggestion regarding the rotor and ABS ring. When you have a rear wheel where the sprocket simply slips off and back on again, common sense dictates that when changing a tire, you remove the sprocket, put it aside and do your work with the rotor and ABS ring off the ground.

Just because Helge doesn't do this on his video doesn't mean he is right. I would be pissed if that was my wheel with the rotor getting scratched up on the gravel when it need not be. Personally, I am a little wary of DIY videos unless I know and trust the source.
 
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